Discipleship, Personal Development, spiritual formation

Monday Rewind: Customized Jesus

This week I bought a grande, triple-shot mocha, with whole milk, and whipped cream. Heart-attack in a cup. I like to live dangerously. I custom-designed it myself.

I can remember a day, back in my teens, when coffee was a lot simpler. There were three fundamental elements for coffee drinkers: black, sugar, and cream. The number of permutations you could come up with was pretty limited. Artificial sweetener wasn’t even an option. You could ask for two lumps of sugar, or if you liked to walk on the wild side, three lumps. If you were a psycho, you’d swap out cream for milk.

Life was simpler back then.

Did you know that Starbucks once boasted that it has 80,000 customizable drink options available to its customers? Imagine that…the thought is almost paralyzing. It’s probably why some people are so confused when they visit a Starbucks for the first time. Classic paralysis by analysis. You can always spot a Starbucks rookie because they usually just gawk at the sign for ten minutes and then order a medium, black coffee, or a large double-double. Amateurs.

Starbucks has mastered what is known as customization. It’s the ability to offer consumers custom-designed products, both efficiently and inexpensively (relatively speaking). Presently, we are living in an era of advancing customization. Having your goods and services customized or personalized, is very much in vogue and is likely not going away. You can order customized t-shirts, cars, eyeglasses – even denim jeans. There are restaurant chains built around customized burgers or pizzas. Coca cola is personalizing it’s bottles by putting people’s most popular first-names on its labels (good luck if your your name is Razzmatazz, or Meshiboleth). Netflix offers personalized channels for each member of your household and websites offer you personalized shopping lists or playlists.

If you’re under thirty, you might assume that this has always been the case. It hasn’t been. Once upon a time, coffee was much simpler.

Customization used to be something only available to the rich or the elite. But now, thanks to the speed of communication and advancements in technology, it’s accessible to the masses.  And what has made it most possible is the DEMAND. It’s hard to sell something that nobody wants. It turns out we’re a culture of consumers. We’re also a culture that highly values individualism. And when you put these two things together, you’ve created a potent mix: “I want it my way, and by golly, I’m gonna have it my way.” Customization is the logical outcome for a culture of consumers.

So gimme my grande, triple-shot mocha, with whole milk, and whipped cream. I’m very important.

The question I’m hoping you will consider is this: Could our demand for customization somehow affect our faith?

This is a rewind to one of my recent teaching messages at Crosspoint Church. You can hear the full message here.

 

Church Planting, Discipleship, Mission, spiritual formation

Monday Rewind: You’ve Gotta Go

Jesus is full of surprises. Just when you think you’ve got him pegged, he pulls an audible and you’re left asking, “Whaaaat?”

When Jesus toured Galilee, early in his ministry, he performed miracles and taught about the kingdom. He also stared down the Pharisees and called people to follow him. His reputation grew and soon a huge entourage was following him.

He was a pretty big deal.

Which is why it’s surprising that he took a little excursion into a village called Nain (Luke 7:11-17). Nain was barely a town. It was more like a small hamlet with a few roads and some settlements. The entrance to the town was the end of a dusty street. It was pretty forgettable. Nobody who was somebody went to Nain. Nobody would have taken selfies in Nain. The Google Maps car wouldn’t have gone through Nain.

And yet Jesus went to Nain. And what we begin to discover, early in the gospel of Luke, is that Jesus wasn’t influenced by wealth, prestige, or fame. He didn’t have a bucket list of all the places he wanted to visit.

Jesus went to places where others wouldn’t go, to reach people that others couldn’t reach.

As followers of Jesus, we’ve got to do the same. The world is not changed if the church stands still. We’ve got to get out and get moving. Movement – wherever, however – is the starting point for Jesus to bring restoration to hearts and lives. His plan to change the world demands the motion of his church. There is no ‘Plan B’.

I wonder…what might that look like for you? You’ll never know, until you start moving. The starting point of mission is intentional – it is seldom accidental. It begins by putting one foot in front of the other.

If we learn anything from Jesus, mission doesn’t always happen in the glamorous places. Jesus’ feet led him to a village called Nain. It can be argued that Jesus put Nain on the map. Sometimes mission takes place in the mundane, everyday experiences, like when you’re out walking your dog. Or when you’re sitting in your work cubicle. Or when you’re down on the corner picking up your mail.

And sometimes mission leads you to go to costly places. Unseemly, dangerous places. Places that won’t bump up your algorithm on social media. Places that won’t make anybody’s bucket list.

Jesus is looking for people who will go where others will not go, to reach people that others will not reach.

Should this surprise us?

This is a rewind to one of my recent teaching messages at Crosspoint Church. You can hear the full message here.